MFS 2019-2020 Annual Report

South Australian Metropolitan Fire Service, 2019-2020 Annual Report

Date presented to Minister: 22 September 2020

To:

Hon Vincent Tarzia MP

Minister for Police, Emergency Services and Correctional Services

This annual report will be presented to Parliament to meet the statutory reporting requirements of South Australian Fire and Emergency Services Act 2005 and the requirements of Premier and Cabinet Circular PC013 Annual Reporting.

This report is verified to be accurate for the purposes of annual reporting to the Parliament of South Australia.

Submitted on behalf of the SOUTH AUSTRALIAN METROPOLITAN FIRE SERVICE by:

Mr Michael Morgan

Chief Officer and Chief Executive

Section A: Reporting required under the Public Sector Act 2009, the Public Sector Regulations 2010 and the Public Finance and Audit Act 1987

Agency purpose or role

The South Australian Metropolitan Fire Service (MFS) is the primary provider of urban firefighting services to the state of South Australia and a statutory authority committed to protecting life, property and the environment from fire and other emergencies.

The MFS is a community-focused organisation that aims to reduce the number of preventable incidents, to protect lives and reduce the economic, social and environmental losses to the community resulting from fires and other emergencies that do occur.

By preventing and quickly and effectively responding to emergencies, the MFS helps make all South Australians safer by protecting lives, property and prosperity.  The MFS also protects the State’s manufacturing and retail industries, thereby protecting jobs, skills and technologies that might not be replaced.

As an agency, the MFS is responsible to the Minister for Emergency Services and works in collaboration with the South Australian Fire and Emergency Services Commission (SAFECOM), the SA Country Fire Service (CFS) and the State Emergency Service (SES).

Overview: about the agency

Our Strategic Focus

Our Purpose

The South Australian Metropolitan Fire Service (MFS) is the primary provider of urban firefighting services to the state of South Australia and a statutory authority committed to protecting life, property and the environment from fire and other emergencies.

The MFS is a community-focused organisation that aims to reduce the number of preventable incidents, to protect lives and reduce the economic, social and environmental losses to the community resulting from fires and other emergencies that do occur.

By preventing and quickly and effectively responding to emergencies, the MFS helps make all South Australians safer by protecting lives, property and prosperity.  The MFS also protects the State’s manufacturing and retail industries, thereby protecting jobs, skills and technologies that might not be replaced.

As an agency, the MFS is responsible to the Minister for Emergency Services and works in collaboration with the South Australian Fire and Emergency Services Commission (SAFECOM), the SA Country Fire Service and the State Emergency Service.

Our Vision

A safer and more prosperous South Australia.

Fires and other emergencies have the potential to harm the public and the things they value.  We seek to actively reduce the number of preventable emergency incidents that occur and ensure our organisation and communities are better prepared for those emergencies that do happen.

Our Values

Community – We will put the needs of our community first.

Safety – We will take all reasonable measures to ensure the safety of the public and our personnel.

Professionalism – Our personnel must be experts in what they do, committed to achieving the highest standards.

Teamwork – Teamwork is essential in all aspects of emergency service provision.

Loyalty, Respect and Integrity – We will act with courage, tenacity and in the best interest of the public.

Responsibility, Accountability and Quality – We will take responsibility for our actions and aim to provide the best possible service and value to our community.

Learning and Improvement – We will learn from our actions and seek to do things even better in the future.

Our functions, objectives and deliverables

 

Our Objectives are:

COMMUNITY – Help make the South Australian community safer and more prosperous.

PREVENTION – Minimise the frequency and effects of fires and other emergencies.

RESPONSE – Reduce risk to life, property, environment and economy through operational excellence.

PREPAREDNESS – Develop a sustainable community-focused organisation.

PUBLIC VALUE – Exceed expected standards of corporate governance and provide public value.

To achieve our objectives, we have adopted the following strategic priorities:

1. Community Focus

  • Deliver first class emergency services that minimise social, economic and environmental loss.
  • Actively engage with our community and authorising environment to identify risks and priorities.
  • Ensure we provide the right services in the right places.
  • Ensure the services we provide are effective, efficient and represent public value.
  • Allocate our budget on the basis of community risks and priorities and operate within it.

2. Frontline Services

PREVENTION

  • Promote the adoption of cost-effective fire safety solutions that protect lives and property.
  • Foster safer behaviours that reduce community loss.
  • Investigate the causes of fires and use findings to reduce their frequency.
  • Prioritise programs that protect those in our community who are at greatest risk.

RESPONSE

  • Ensure we respond to all emergencies and manage them safely, effectively and efficiently.
  • Continuously review and improve our operational effectiveness and efficiency.
  • Advance our emergency and incident management capability.
  • Ensure we dispatch South Australian emergency resources within agreed industry standards.
  • Provide direct support to our workforce and community during and after emergencies.
  • Improve the effectiveness and efficiency of MFS alarm systems.

3. Frontline Support Services

PREPAREDNESS

  • Identify and implement strategies to increase the diversity of firefighter recruits to reflect our contemporary society.
  • Develop strategies to ensure a planned, more sustainable and highly skilled workforce that addresses our ageing workforce demographic and ‘fitness for duty’.
  • Develop and implement a Learning and Development Doctrine that enhances the quality, consistency and interoperability of our educational and assessment methods.
  • Ensure effective and efficient procurement, management and use of fit for purpose infrastructure, appliances and equipment.

4. Governance and Public Value

ORGANISATIONAL PERFORMANCE AND VALUE

  • Improve the integration and effectiveness of services provided by the emergency services sector to deliver public value.
  • Freely provide transparent and accurate information to the public and our workforce.
  • Ensure the effective management of MFS functional support services.
  • Meet expected standards of governance, risk management, compliance and value expected by our community and stakeholders.

PEOPLE AND CULTURE

  • Improve the physical, mental and emotional wellness of MFS personnel.
  • Develop a professional culture that improves effectiveness, efficiency and public value.
  • Develop a sustainable, highly skilled workforce that reflects our community.
  • Employ effective Human Resources management systems consistent with the broader SA public sector.

The Agency's performance

Performance at a glance

  • The MFS is responsible for the protection of the South Australian community from the effects of fires, road crash, hazardous materials, rescues and other incidents and deals with the effects of emergencies on a daily basis.  The MFS operates from 20 stations throughout greater metropolitan Adelaide and 17 stations in major regional centres.
  • During 2019-20 the MFS responded to around 21 000 emergency incidents.  Of these, 18 163 generated a response from Metropolitan Operations; and 2 797 from Regional Operations. In comparison, response numbers increased from the 2018-19 financial year, in part due to the volume of responses generated by the South Australian bushfires and a significant increase in the number of rescues performed.
  • MFS Regional Operations provide an emergency service to the major regional centres protecting a significant proportion of South Australia’s regional population, infrastructure and economic assets.  During 2019-20, five MFS regional stations responded to more than 300 emergency incidents and these include: Mount Gambier (459), Port Augusta (308), Whyalla (414), Port Pirie (321) and Mount Barker (305).
  • The risks to our community continue to change over time. MFS statistics have shown that the rate of structural fires has continued to drop. However, as fires now burn hotter and faster and have greater potential to cause significant damage and loss. Other risks, including the risk of road crashes requiring rescue continues to rise as the population of urban areas increases. 
  • In response to the global COVID-19 pandemic, MFS Special Operations/ HAZMAT Department took lead responsibility for:
    • The development and coordination of the MFS COVID-19 Taskforce.
    • Ensuring that the MFS follow the advice of the Office of the Commissioner for Public Sector Employment and SA Health.
    • Consultation with the United Firefighters Union of SA regarding amended operational practice, to enable the continuation of our operational capability, whilst also ensuring the safety of our personnel.
    • Supporting the State Emergency Management team in SA Health.
    • The provision of advice and physical resources to effectively facilitate MFS staff in implementing work from home and remote meeting strategies.
    • Navigate the MFS through the Transition to Recovery.    

Agency contribution to whole of Government objective

Key objective

Agency’s contribution

More jobs

Preparedness (Learning and Development) – Actively engaging with community forums and marketing the service to members of the community who may not have previously considered firefighting as a profession.  Our aim is to increase the gender and cultural diversity among potential firefighter recruit applicants.

Lower costs

Preparedness – Continuous improvement of our responses and incident management capabilities.  Our aim is to provide coordinated and robust Emergency Management arrangements by working collaboratively, to enhance the integration of emergency response and ensure we provide the closest, fastest and most appropriate resources to all emergencies. 

Better Services

Public Value – Meet expected standards of governance, risk management, compliance and value expected by our community and stakeholders. Our aim is to provide an efficient and accountable government service and enhance customer satisfaction.

Preparedness – During a period of significant workforce renewal, our aim is to develop a sustainable, highly skilled workforce that reflects our community.  The MFS also invests heavily in programs that support the health and wellbeing of our employees and their families.

Agency specific objectives and performance

To achieve our objectives, we have adopted the following strategic priorities:

  1. Community Focus
  • Deliver first class emergency services that minimise social, economic and environmental loss.
  • Actively engage with our community and authorising environment to identify risks and priorities.
  • Ensure we provide the right services in the right places.
  • Ensure the services we provide are effective, efficient and represent public value.
  • Allocate our budget on the basis of community risks and priorities and operate within it.
  1. Frontline Services

PREVENTION

  • Promote the adoption of cost-effective fire safety solutions that protect lives and property.
  • Foster safer behaviours that reduce community loss.
  • Investigate the causes of fires and use findings to reduce their frequency.
  • Prioritise programs that protect those in our community who are at greatest risk.

RESPONSE

  • Ensure we respond to all emergencies and manage them safely, effectively and efficiently.
  • Continuously review and improve our operational effectiveness and efficiency.
  • Advance our emergency and incident management capability.
  • Ensure we dispatch South Australian emergency resources within agreed industry standards.
  • Provide direct support to our workforce and community during and after emergencies.
  • Improve the effectiveness and efficiency of MFS alarm systems.

 

  1. Frontline Support Services

PREPAREDNESS

  • Identify and implement strategies to increase the diversity of firefighter recruits to reflect our contemporary society.
  • Develop strategies to ensure a planned, more sustainable and highly skilled workforce that addresses our ageing workforce demographic and ‘fitness for duty’.
  • Develop and implement a Learning and Development Doctrine that enhances the quality, consistency and interoperability of our educational and assessment methods.
  • Ensure effective and efficient procurement, management and use of fit for purpose infrastructure, appliances and equipment.

 

  1. Governance and Public Value

ORGANISATIONAL PERFORMANCE AND VALUE

  • Improve the integration and effectiveness of services provided by the emergency services sector to deliver public value.
  • Freely provide transparent and accurate information to the public and our workforce.
  • Ensure the effective management of MFS functional support services.
  • Meet expected standards of governance, risk management, compliance and value expected by our community and stakeholders.

PEOPLE AND CULTURE

  • Improve the physical, mental and emotional wellness of MFS personnel.
  • Develop a professional culture that improves effectiveness, efficiency and public value.
  • Develop a sustainable, highly skilled workforce that reflects our community.
  • Employ effective Human Resources management systems consistent with the broader SA public sector.
  • Strive for a more diverse and inclusive organisation.

 

Agency objectives

Indicators

Performance

Frontline Services – Community

Foster behaviours that increase community preparedness. This includes a range of activities such as educational visits, consumer warnings, home fire safety presentations, teachers’ resources and information distribution.

  • 91 home fire safety presentations.
  • 510 educational tours, visits and community events scheduled.  (Due to COVID-19 all engagements from March to June were cancelled.)
  • Projected total of 123 136 attendees in community education programs.

Frontline Services

– Prevention

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Identify risks associated with fire and other emergencies. 

The MFS investigated:

  • 153 fires for the MFS.
  • 58 fires for the CFS.

Fire cause established in more than 89% of all fires examined.

This success rate means that causes are identified, and dangerous products are promptly removed from the community.

Foster behaviours that increase community preparedness. MFS provides the following programs:

  • Road Awareness Program (RAP)
  • Juvenile Fire Lighters Intervention Program (JFLIP)
  • 128 RAP presentations took place involving a projected total of 11 198 participants.  Over 98% of the RAP participants indicated that they will adopt safer behaviours post-program.
  • 0% of participants in JFLIP reoffend. The MFS believes that this program reduces community risk by decreasing the incidence of repeat fire lighting.

Ensure South Australian environs are safe places to live and work.

 

MFS Built Environs programs help to ensure the safety of the South Australian public buildings. This includes ensuring new developments have required fire safety systems and do not employ high risk products or construction methods.

MFS conducted:

  • 113 education and health facilities inspections and fire safety surveys.
  • 319 building development proposals assessments.
  • 45 hazard complaint sites investigations.
  • 367 fire alarm inspections and connections.
  • 98% of building development assessments were completed within 28 days.
  • 236 booster/hydrant tests/commissioning
  • 386 Building Fire Safety Committee meetings/inspections.
  • 16 hot smoke tests conducted.

MFS Built Environs also:

  • Consulted with developers and certifiers on a number of high-profile State Government infrastructure projects which remain ongoing.
  • Actively engaged with the Department for Infrastructure and Transport (DIT) to undertake building inspections associated with aluminium composite panels (cladding) and provide advice to rectification work.

Frontline Services – Response & Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ensure the development and delivery of effective emergency management systems.

  • 100% of major community events had a current fire protection plan.

Ensure appropriate response is committed to 100% of all incident types.

  • 100% of all incidents had an appropriate response committed.

Ensure the safe and effective management and control of incidents and emergencies.

  • 73% of building and other structure fires were contained part of room or area of origin.
  • 65% of building fires were contained to the room of origin.

Ensure the MFS responds to all fires and other emergencies with timely and weighted response.

  • The total number of incidents generating a response from Metropolitan Operations was     18 163. 
  • The total number of incidents generating a response from Regional Operations was              2 797.
  • Average Metropolitan ‘out the door time’ was  106 seconds, meeting target of less than 120 seconds.
  • The % of MFS arrivals within 7 mins of a callout in a metropolitan area with a fulltime crew was 75%.
  • The % of MFS arrivals within  11 mins of a callout in a Regional area:
    • With a Retained crew was 63%.
    • For Station 50 Pt Pirie was 95%. 
    • For Station 70 Mt Gambier was 78%. 

(Collective Regional target of 90%.)

Ensure effective operational call receipt and dispatch.

  • Total of 33 556 emergency calls were received.
  • Average time to answer 000 emergency calls was 5 seconds (within target of 5 seconds).
  • In 87% of cases, Triple Zero calls were answered on first presentation.

Frontline Support Services – Learning & Development

A highly skilled workforce that can safely undertake roles required of MFS personnel.

  • 100% of firefighter separations were filled.
  • 48 new firefighting personnel were successfully recruited.
  • 48 Recruits completed Certificate II in Public Safety (Firefighting & Emergency Operations).

Establish and maintain effective career development systems.

  • 392 personnel enrolled in nationally recognised training through the MFS Staff Development Framework; 341 mandatory enrolments; and 51 voluntary enrolments.
  • MFS personnel enrolled in a total of 1 516 units of study   (1 292 mandatory and 224 voluntary).

Frontline Support Services – Infrastructure & Logistics

Ensure the provision of efficient whole of life vehicle and equipment solutions.

MFS fleet reserve capability was severely impacted by:

  • The rising fleet age and associated maintenance.
  • Allocation of two vehicles to Mt Barker and environs.
  • Increased recruit training demand (six appliances are required to conduct the 15-week course with 24 recruits).
  • Contamination of appliances by perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS).
  • Fitting of Burn Over Protection (BOPS).
  • Chassis rust and pump mounting failures which both require repairs from an out-sourced engineer.
  • Surge Response Group (SRG) requirements.

 

  • Operational performance was supported by appropriate vehicles and equipment at 100% of incidents.
  • The maintenance of fleet reserve capability (min of 2 reserve appliances available 100% of the time) was 30% (well below the target of 80%). 
  • Appliances responded to incidents with no report of failure that has impeded their arrival; however due to the age of the appliances and the ongoing cost of maintenance the MFS must be prepared that the risk of future failure is probable.

Fleet Age:

  • 30% of total MFS fleet require replacement within two years (Target of <12%).
  • 25 General Purpose Pumps requiring replacement within two years (Target of 9).
  • 1 Aerials requiring replacement within two years (Target of 4).
  • 1 Specialist vehicles requiring replacement within two years (Target of 1).
  • 5 4x2 Medium Urban Pumpers (MUP) requiring replacement within two years.
  • 2 Bulk Water Carriers requiring replacement within two years.
  • 2 Hooklifts requiring replacement within two years.

Frontline Support Services – Governance & Public Value

 

Develop the leadership and management skills of our personnel.

The MFS develops current and future leaders through access to graduate and post-graduate management qualifications.  At senior management level, personnel have access to Graduate Certificate, Diploma and Masters programs.

  • 90% of senior managers hold tertiary qualifications.

Ensure sustainable and environmentally friendly practices are employed.

 

The MFS aims to:

  • reduce energy usage;
  • increase the volume of water reclaimed from fire training activities; and
  • restrict the volume of contaminated water released during firefighting activities.

Increase the total of MFS photovoltaic energy generation.

All new MFS stations are built with a minimum of 12kW systems. The MFS now has a total photovoltaic energy capability of 120kW (Target of >105kW).

Ensure all required organisational plans are developed.

The MFS is required to develop key plans for submission to the SAFECOM Board.

The following plans were submitted:

  • MFS Business Plan
  • MFS Workforce Plan.

(Note: Report submission was delayed due to COVID-19; yet both reports were submitted in first quarter of 2020-21).

Ensure effective corporate governance.

  • 3 SAFECOM Board quarterly reports submitted (Target of 4).
  • 4 Corporate Governance Committee meetings conducted (Target of 5).
  • 12 Planning & Resilience Committee meetings conducted (Target of 5).
  • 9 Finance Committee meetings conducted (Target of 5).

Indicators or fiscal performance:

  • An unqualified report from the Auditor General.
  • Compliant with Audit and Verification System for safety and injury management to AS/NZS 4801 2000.
  • Injury Management: meeting key requirements of the Return to Work Act.

 

Corporate performance summary

  • The MFS is responsible for the receipt of 000 calls for the South Australian Country Fire Service (CFS), the South Australian State Emergency Service (SES) and the MFS and the emergency dispatch of crews for these agencies. 
  • In the past financial year, the MFS handled approximately 33 000 emergency calls.  The average time to answer 000 emergency calls was 5 seconds (within target of 5 seconds). In 87% of cases, Triple Zero calls were answered on first presentation.

  • On the 20 December 2019, (the day of the Cudlee Creek fire) the MFS managed 4 055 calls, including 1 844 triple zero calls; and dispatched 880 incidents, including 21 greater alarms.
  • Metropolitan Operations attended approximately 18 000 incidents during 2019-20.  Of these, 942 were structure fires, 483 vehicle fires, 4 610 rescues and 394 HAZMAT incidents.  Average Metropolitan ‘out the door time’ was 106 seconds, meeting our target of less than 120 seconds.
  • During 2019-20, Regional Operations attended approximately 2 800 incidents. This included 147 structure fires, 73 vehicle fires, 411 rescues and 89 HAZMAT incidents.  Despite the impact of COVID-19, two regional stations improved their percentage of arrivals within the target of 11 minutes, compared to 2018-19 data.
  • A range of preventative strategies continue to be implemented by the MFS, to help foster behaviours that increase community preparedness.  During 2019-20, the MFS undertook a range of activities, including 91 home fire safety presentations and a total of 510 educational tours, visits and community events were scheduled. Unfortunately, due to the COVID-19 pandemic all  engagements from March to June were cancelled.  The projected total of attendees to MFS community education programs was 123 136 people.  Collectively, these MFS activities continue to create a positive impact in the continuing decline in the number of structure fires.
  • The MFS Fire Behaviour Training Facility at Angle Park is near completion. This facility will ensure MFS firefighters and emergency services staff are provided with the critical operational training required to respond to high-risk urban fires.

Learning and Development personnel are reviewing the structural firefighting recruit training program and commencing initial planning for the development and delivery of future training in the new MFS facility.

Employment opportunity programs

Program name

Performance

Workforce Renewal

Enhance the capacity and efficiency of recruitment and recruit training processes.

Efficiencies have been realised through the introduction of an application fee; and through re-engineering and resequencing the Firefighter Recruitment and Selection Process.  Each new Recruit Course takes 75 business days.  Graduates receive the nationally recognised Certificate II in Public Safety (Firefighting & Emergency Operations).

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic saw the predicted staff separation rate significantly reduce; hence, this caused the Recruitment Program to be suspended/revised to enable the MFS to remain within our authorised FTE count.  Separations are expected to return to predicted rates in the coming years.

Workforce Renewal

Increase the gender  and cultural diversity among potential firefighter recruit applicants.

Actively engaging with community forums and marketing the service to members of the community who may not have previously considered firefighting as a profession.  This continues to be achieved through promotional campaigns and activities including public space advertising, radio and digital media advertising and numerous career and pre-application information sessions.

During 2019-20, two Recruit Courses were completed which resulted in 48 new employees successfully joining the MFS ranks.  These employees were drawn from the recruitment campaign in 2018. 

The MFS will also:

  • Continue to engage in active recruitment campaign strategies to promote the MFS as an inclusive employer of choice;
  • Continue organisational involvement in the Male Champions of Change Program; and
  • Maintain and promote White Ribbon Accreditation.

Workforce Renewal

Enhanced MFS capability to train personnel in high-risk settings as firefighters and officers.

The MFS continues to invest heavily in workforce learning and development to ensure new and existing operational personnel can work safely and effectively in high-risk environments.

The MFS provides a minimum of eight years competency-based training through the Staff Development Framework and tertiary level qualifications through the Executive Development Program.

A new Structural Fire Behaviour Training Facility at Grand Junction Road, Angle Park is near completion. It is anticipated that training in the facility will commence in late 2020.

Agency performance management and development systems

Performance management and development system

Performance

MFS Organisational Doctrine – Provides broad guidance to personnel concerning how to behave and think in both operational and non-operational settings.

Continued implementation of the MFS organisational doctrine occurred, including alignment with behaviour management, cultural renewal and diversity strategies.

MFS Staff Development Framework (SDF) – All MFS personnel are provided access to career-long nationally recognised competency-based training.  All new Firefighters must complete six years of mandatory development.

341 personnel were compulsorily enrolled in nationally recognised qualifications through the MFS SDF. 

In addition, 51 personnel voluntarily enrolled in nationally recognised professional development programs. 

Collectively, MFS personnel were enrolled in a total of 1 516 units of study.

The draft policy entitled ‘Managing Behaviour of MFS Employees’ will guide the behaviour management of all MFS employees covered by the provisions of Part 3, Division 7 of the South Australian Fire and Emergency Services Act (2005)

The policy is accompanied by a draft ‘MFS Behavioural Appraisal template’, designed as a supportive mechanism for continuous improvement, through the provision of timely feedback and ongoing development of employee behaviours, skills and competencies.

Draft policy and appraisal template will be progressed through active consultation and engagement with relevant stakeholders, via the newly developed MFS Diversity and Inclusion Committee.

Emergency Services Sector Planned Review and Development (PRD) for MFS operational support staff.

PRD sessions between MFS employees and their line managers continue, in compliance with sector policy requirements.

Review and development of operational staff.

Operational personnel participate in mandatory performance management discussions through less formal but effective post incident review, skills acquisition and reacquisition training on an ongoing basis.

Work health, safety and return to work programs

Program name

Performance

MFS Employee Support Program

100% of Station Visits by the Employee Support Coordinator and Psychological Consultant based on risk priority was achieved.

There has been a 25% increase in EAP referrals in the last 12 months, as a result of the roll out of the Mental Health First Aid Training; and continued promotion of the effectiveness of the program in implementing and achieving early intervention strategies for improved resolution of issues.

(Note: Mental Health First Aid program is 95% completed due to restrictions brought about by COVID-19.)

MFS Vaccination Program

90% of the workforce voluntarily participated in flu vaccinations.

100% participation in the HepB vaccination program for those in frontline full-time employment.

The MFS provides vaccinations for USAR Cat 2 qualified personnel for protection consistent with diseases and infections that might reasonably expect to be encountered whilst on deployment.

 

Program name

Performance

MFS Employee Wellness & Safety

Continued development of strategies to assist in reducing workplace injury/illness and ensure the safest effective recovery/return to work.  Programs include:

Transition to retirement

Pre and post retirement support processes are 70% completed.

Health and Fitness

Injury/illness data analysis compliments the ongoing movement screening testing, gym equipment rationalisation and purchase and the commencement of station gym refurbishments.

Voluntary health checks continue along with the development of annual health checks aligned to functional fitness requirements. 

White Ribbon Campaign

MFS is an accredited White Ribbon organisation and continues to provide a safer workplace through this ongoing program.

AFAC Male Champions of Change

Continuing to implement the strategies developed by AFAC to enhance cultural change management processes.

Diversity and Inclusion

Strategies are being developed and implemented to ensure the MFS becomes a more diverse and inclusive organisation.

Operational Safety

PFAS - All stations are occupied and there is a review of the program currently being undertaken.

MFS continues to be involved in AFAC activities including PPC, Operational strategies, WHS and procurement (PPC, appliances, equipment).

Review of Drug and Alcohol policy and procedures.

Mental Health Resilience

PEER program - Training upgraded and membership expanded.

Other programs are being periodically reviewed to provide assistance include: Domestic and Family Violence; Bullying and Harassment; and Physical Health, Fitness and Wellbeing.

 

Program name

Performance

Risk Management – The MFS Work Health Safety and Injury Management (WHS&IM) system is aligned to AS/NZS 4801 (Occupational health and safety management systems – specification with guidelines for use).  The system is underpinned by the philosophies and methods set out in AS/NZS/ISO 31 000, (Risk Management – Principles and guidelines) to ensure the MFS achieves its safety and injury management objectives.

WHS&IM system performance is evaluated through internal and external audit, review and investigation of incidents, analysis of hazard, incident, near miss (HIRM) reports, and workers compensation (SIMS) data and surveys to ensure effectiveness and ongoing improvement.

Injury Management – Firefighting remains a physically and mentally demanding occupation; the MFS commits considerable priority and resources to managing employee injuries.

There were 2 notifiable incidents during the 2019-20 period with none resulting in the issuing of a provisional improvement, improvement or prohibition notice.  Consequently, there were no prosecutions or enforceable undertakings required. 

Total gross workers compensation expenditure decreased by 15% with the major contributing factor being a decrease of 28% in income payments.

 

Workplace injury claims

Current year
 2019-20

Past year

2018-19

% Change
(+ / -)

Total new workplace injury claims

138

118

0.73%

Fatalities

1

1

0%

Seriously injured workers*

1

0

100%

Significant injuries (where lost time exceeds a working week, expressed as frequency rate per 1000 FTE)

39.29

32.58

-4.03%

 

*number of claimants assessed during the reporting period as having a whole person impairment of 30% or more under the Return to Work Act 2014 (Part 2 Division 5)
 

Work health and safety regulations

Current year 2019-20

Past year

2018-19

% Change
(+ / -)

Number of notifiable incidents (Work Health and Safety Act 2012, Part 3)

2

4

-50%

Number of provisional improvements, improvement and prohibition notices (Work Health and Safety Act 2012 Sections 90, 191 and 195)

0

0

0%

 

Return to work costs**

Current year 2019-20

Past year

2018-19

% Change
(+ / -)

Total gross workers compensation expenditure ($)

5 682 283

6 714 964

-15%

Income support payments – gross ($)

2 212 909

3 090 732

-28%

**before third party recovery


Data for previous years is available at: https://data.sa.gov.au/data/dataset/annual-report-data-whs-and-return-to-work/resource/aec7c488-944d-477e-9dc2-aaeaf4e44b55    

 

Executive employment in the agency

Executive classification

Number of executives

EXEC0B

1

EXEC0C

1


Data for previous years is available at:  https://data.sa.gov.au/data/dataset/annual-report-data-executive-employment/resource/fdd65825-b107-4e97-984b-3060dbf35a27

The Office of the Commissioner for Public Sector Employment has a workforce information page that provides further information on the breakdown of executive gender, salary and tenure by agency.