PDI Regulation 45 Referrals

The requirements and procedures for initiating the Regulation 45 Fire Authority Report process and the submission requirements for the report itself can be found on the PDI Regulation 45 – Building Design Consultation page.

Charges associated with a Regulation 45 referral are determined on an hourly basis, covering time associated with meetings, review of submitted documentation and preparation of the report itself.  The hourly rates for these activities are set in SA Government Schedule 17.  The time committed to a Regulation 45 referral typical depends on the complexity of the project, the amount of documentation required to be review and the quality of the documentation and information submitted.

The MFS encourages consultation on all projects, particularly in relation to the installed fire safety systems that the MFS will interact, such as fire hydrant systems and automatic detection and alarm systems.  This is particularly useful and valuable where MFS testing pursuant to Regulation 103 will be required for a project.  The MFS does not charge for consultation services where a project does not require a Regulation 45 Fire Authority Referral.

PDI Regulation 103 Fire Safety System Testing

To book a fire system test, please complete and submit the relevant online form.  You will need to make a separate application for each system you require testing for:

For booster and fire hydrant systems:

Booster and Fire Hydrant Systems Testing

For automatic fire alarm systems:

Automatic Fire Alarm Systems (MFS Monitored)

For smoke management systems:

Smoke Management Systems

Planning, Development and Infrastructure (General) Regulation 103 requires that for certain installed fire safety systems “the council must not grant a certificate of occupancy unless or until it has sought a report from the fire authority as to whether those facilities have been installed and operate satisfactorily”.  In order to verify the installation and satisfactory operation of these systems, the MFS conducts inspections and functionality testing.  The testing conducted by the MFS are not compliance audits of the installed system, nor are they commissioning testing in accordance with the requirements of the relevant system installation standards.  These inspections and tests are to confirm that the system operates functionally as designed and is compatible with MFS equipment.

In the case of monitored fire alarm systems, compliance with the requirements of MFS Policy 37 Fire Alarm Conditions of Connection is confirmed before the system is connected to the MFS monitoring service.

In the case of fire hydrant systems, the minimum design hydraulic performance of the system, and thus the ability of the MFS to effectively use the system, is confirmed via recording of the flows and pressures achieved during the test.

In the case of hot smoke testing, these tests dynamically and holistically verify the coordinated and integrated operation of all necessary building fire safety systems required to function in the event of a fire alarm activation where smoke management systems are installed.  Hot smoke testing can not be used to verify the actual performance of the installed smoke management system.

All installed fire safety systems must be commissioned by the installing contractor in accordance with the requirements of the relevant installation standard.  This should occur prior to any Regulation 103 inspections or testing conducted by the MFS.

Further information can be found on the PDI Regulation 103 – Inspection & Testing of Fire Systems page.

All new fire hydrant system installations and alterations to existing fire hydrant installations must be booked with the OTR and are subject to auditing, as per OTR Plumbing Advisory Note (Revised March 2019).  A copy of the OTR certificate must be received by the MFS Built Environment Section before MFS testing of the hydrant system can occur.

You may wish to arrange the booking for the MFS test to secure a preferred date, prior to an OTR certificate being issued.  Please keep in mind however that the test will not proceed at the arranged time if the MFS is not in receipt of the OTR certificate before the booked date, and an alternate date for the testing will need to be arranged. Whilst the MFS will make all effort to accommodate deferred test bookings, the timing of deferred tests will be subject to MFS availability.

At the request of the fire contractor for the project and in consultation with the builder, an inspection/test time will be booked by the MFS.  Generally, the MFS would expect the fire contractor’s scope of works to be completed with only minor fitout works outstanding, such as painting and joinery or appliance installation.  There must be no unfinished construction work and the site must be clear of any electrical hazards, trip hazards and the like.  The site also needs to be fully accessible to fire crews who would be responding to an automatic fire alarm notification.  Construction workers should not be onsite during the inspection/testing.

Generally, the MFS does not provide copies of documents to third parties. We suggest you contact the party to whom the document was issued.  If you are unsure of who this is, we can provide that information to you.

In accordance with PDI (General) Regulation 103 under which the testing of certain fire safety systems is conducted, a period of 15 business days is nominated in which the relevant fire authority is to provide a report. However, the MFS typically issues these reports well under this timeframe.  You may usually expect to receive the report or Certificate of Connection (in the case of a fire alarm system to be monitored by the MFS) within 2-5 business days.  Please note that periods of high testing requests and activity (e.g. in the lead-up to Christmas) may result in slightly longer timeframes in which reports may be issued.

Testing of fire safety systems pursuant to PDI (General) Regulation 103 are chargeable services.  Details of MFS charging rates can be found in SA Government Schedule 17 [link].

Charges for fire hydrant system testing will comprise an hourly rate for the BES Water Officer and Technical Assistant, as well as a charge for flow test equipment used.  Where the system being tested includes a booster connection, charges will include an hourly rate for an MFS crew/s and appliance/s, as necessary.

Charges for inspection and testing of monitored fire alarm systems will comprise an hourly rate for an MFS Alarms Officer.  Larger and complex buildings will require attendance by two (2) MFS Alarms Officers, for which both will be charged at an hourly rate.

Charges for hot smoke testing of smoke management systems will comprise an hourly rate for a minimum of three (3) BES staff, comprising operational firefighters and technical staff (engineer and/or building surveyor).  In certain circumstances, attendance by an on-shift MFS firefighting crew and appliance may also be required, which will be charged at an hourly rate.  Additional equipment and materials for the hot smoke test are required to be supplied by the applicant (fire services contractor).  For further information please refer to the Smoke Management Systems section on the PDI Regulation 103 – Inspection & Testing of Fire Systems page.

Fire alarm systems monitored by the MFS must comply with the requirements of MFS Policy 37 Fire Alarm Conditions of Connection [link].  For fire detection and alarm systems, this includes full compliance with AS1670.1, unless otherwise agreed to through an approved Performance Solution, including all requirements regarding the occupant warning system and required sound pressure levels (SPLs).  This includes the minimum SPLs achieved within sole occupancy units (SOUs), irrespective of any concessions allowed by the NCC.  The MFS considers achieving the SPLs as required by AS1670.1 is particularly important in the ability and likelihood of the installed alarm system arousing sleeping occupants.

Hazardous Chemicals and Emergency Planning

The purpose of submitting an Emergency Plan to the MFS and CFS is threefold:

  1. Your draft Emergency Plan may be reviewed by the MFS and/or CFS and recommendations may be forwarded in relation to improving your Emergency Plan.
  2. The final Emergency Plan is required to be forwarded to a local MFS or CFS, depending on the area the business is located in. The receipt of a facility final Emergency Plan at a station may initiate a familiarisation visit by local fire crews and enable them to develop a Pre-Incident Plan which is tailored to your site.
  3. In the future, information in relation to the specific hazards associated with your site will be recorded electronically and the MFS/CFS Communications Centre will be able to initiate an appropriate response to an incident involving your site. Additionally the information will enable responding crews to formulate appropriate initial actions on arrival at an incident involving a notifiable site.

Please complete the Dangerous Goods Emergency Plan Submission form and attach associated forms in our online booking form.

Dangerous Goods Emergency Plan Submission

The MFS will acknowledge receipt of all emails within two working days. If you have not received an acknowledgement within this timeframe please phone the MFS Scientific Officer on (08) 8204 3600.

To reduce document storage, the MFS and CFS prefers draft and final Emergency Plans to be submitted electronically where possible. Word or PDF formats are preferred.

The MFS and/or CFS will forward an email acknowledging receipt of your draft Emergency Plan – (Your "acknowledgement of receipt date"), this will usually be forwarded to you within two working days when receipting an emailed plan and within 21 working days of a posted plan.

As there are an estimated 5,000 notifiable sites throughout South Australia it is not anticipated that the MFS and/or CFS will be able to review every Emergency Plan submitted.

Emergency Plans reviewed will be prioritised according to the quantity and nature of the dangerous goods stored/processed on site.

The MFS and/or CFS will process your draft Emergency Plan, and if you have not received a formal response from the MFS and/or CFS within 90 days from your acknowledgement of receipt date, your draft Emergency Plan is not intended to be reviewed by the MFS and/or CFS.

If you have not received recommendations in relation to your Emergency Plan from the MFS and/or CFS within 90 days from your "acknowledgement of receipt date" your Emergency Plans status can be automatically modified to a "Final Emergency Plan" and formally implemented.

While waiting for the MFS and/or CFS to process your draft Emergency Plan, we strongly recommend that the draft Emergency Plan is implemented as an interim measure.

Yes, your Emergency Plan can be reviewed at a later stage, this may occur following your familiarisation visit by local MFS or CFS crews or where concerns about the adequacy of your Emergency Plan have arisen following an incident or the conduction of a simulated emergency drill exercise.

Yes, it is very important that you include your Safework SA Dangerous Goods Notification Number with your submitted documentation.

This number will be recorded and collated by the MFS and CFS, an annual report of Emergency Plans received by the MFS and CFS will be forwarded to Safework SA.

Safework SA will match the MFS and CFS report against their records and notifiable sites may be subject to penalties from Safework SA if an Emergency Plan has not been submitted to the MFS and/or CFS in accordance with the relevant legislation.

Yes, Regulation 43 of the Work Health and Safety Regulation 2012 requires your Emergency Plan to be revised if there is a change in circumstances at your premises.

If your site has exceeded Manifest quantities of Dangerous Goods as detailed in Schedule 11 of the Work Health and Safety Regulations 2012 and therefore subject to the provisions of Regulation 43 of the Work Health and Safety Regulations 2012 you are required to revise your Emergency Plan.

As a new hazard which has the potential to impact your site has been identified it is good practice to revise your Emergency Plan to address the new risk.

The MFS and CFS however, recommend that if a new off-site hazard has been identified which has the potential to impact your site, your Emergency Plan should be appropriately revised to address the new off-site risk.

Yes, Regulation 43 of the Work Health and Safety Regulations 2012 requires Emergency Plans to be maintained so they remain effective.

The MFS and CFS recommends that this is a minimum of every 5 years and also recommend that your Emergency Plans' contact list is revised annually, this will ensure that organisational changes in personnel are captured and thereby assist in maintaining the currency of your Emergency Plan.

The MFS and CFS recommend that Major Hazard Facilities submit their emergency plan for review to the fire services annually (prior to their annual safety audit).

A flowchart has been produced in PDF format detailing the process followed by the MFS and CFS after you have submitted your Emergency Plan.

You can download the flowchart here.

Yes, both Regulation 347, Regulation 361 and Regulation 557 of the Work Health and Safety Regulations 2012 have specific requirements in relation to providing copies of Final Emergency Plans to MFS and/or CFS.

Even though you are required to forward copies of the Final Emergency Plan to the fire service, there is no guarantee that fire crews responding to an incident at your site will be in a position to access their copy of your Emergency Plan (e.g. they may be away from their station when they receive a request to respond to an incident or another station which does not hold a copy of your Emergency Plan may be requested to respond).

A copy of the emergency plan and ESIP is to be provided and kept easily accessible to the SA Fire Services at all times. The following are acceptable locations for the manifest:

  • At the hydrant booster assembly, if fitted
  • At the main site entrance adjacent to the outer warning placard
  • Inside the security gatehouse or similar if staffed 24 hours 7 days
  • At alternative vehicular entrances adjacent to the outer warning placard (where provided)

The plans should be provided within a prominently labelled weather proofed container (e.g. a lock box), secured with a 003 lock if unauthorised access needs to be prevented.

Please refer to the FAQ - "What should an organisation do about "storing the manifest" so it is accessible to emergency services?" for more information.

For further information in relation to other obligations and statutory requirements associated with dangerous goods sites please go to the Safework SA website

OR
call the Safework SA switchboard on 1300 365 255

The MFS and/or CFS can provide a written recommendation about the content or effectiveness of the Emergency Plan. If the MFS and/or CFS does give written recommendation, you must revise the plan in accordance with the recommendation (WHS Clause 361 (3)). Major Hazard Facilities have other obligations as outlined in the WHS Regulations 2012.

Upon receipt of the Emergency Plan, you will receive an email acknowledging submission of the plan. If submission occurred via email, you should receive an acknowledgement email within two working days. If submission occurred via post, an acknowledgement email should be received within 21 days. Contact the MFS Scientific Officer on 8204 3600 if you do not receive this acknowledgement.

MFS and/or CFS will process your draft Emergency Plan and based on the result, the Emergency Plan may be reviewed.

Emergency Plans not undertaking immediate review will be provided to the relevant local MFS/CFS area so it can be incorporated into their local preparedness activities. This may include visiting the workplace.

After the review has been completed, a written recommendation will be provided to the workplace and a copy of the recommendation will also be provided to SafeWork SA (the regulator).

We have provided a flow chart which details how the MFS and CFS process your draft Emergency Plan.

Yes. The emergency plan should be tested when first created and after each modification.

Throughout the year practice drills and simulated emergencies should be undertaken and involve all workers and the emergency services. These drills should be focused on familiarising anyone who would be involved in an incident related to the storage and handling of hazardous chemicals with the workplace procedures.

SA Fire Services must be invited to all practice drills and simulated irrespective of where the business is located in the state. Invitations must not go direct to the local CFS or MFS station. Email invitations through to the MFS Scientific Officer: samfsscientificofficer@sa.gov.au.

Information on writing exercises can be found in the Australian Disaster Resilience Handbook Collection: Managing Exercises.

There is a requirement in the Work Health and Safety Regulations 2012 Section 347 (3) for the person (as defined in the Act) to keep the manifest:

  • in a place determined in agreement with the primary emergency service
  • available for inspection under the Act
  • readily accessible to the emergency services organisation.

A copy of the Emergency Plan and Emergency Services Information Package (ESIP) is to be provided and kept easily accessible to the SA Fire Services at all times. The following are acceptable locations for the manifest:

  • At the hydrant booster assembly, if fitted
  • At the main site entrance adjacent to the outer warning placard
  • Inside the security gatehouse or similar if staffed 24 hours 7 days
  • At alternative vehicular entrances adjacent to the outer warning placard (where provided).

The plans should be provided within a prominently labelled weather proofed container (e.g. a lock box), secured with a 003 lock if unauthorised access needs to be prevented.

The container should be:

  • easily identifiable
  • coloured red
  • prominently labelled with white "Emergency Information" and "HAZMAT" lettering (minimum 40mm height), across the front of the container.

A full copy of the Emergency Plan, ESIP, manifest, hazardous chemicals register and Safety Data Sheet (SDS) should be provided and made available in any dedicated Emergency/Fire Control Centre. At larger sites, the MFS and CFS recommends that as a minimum, a copy of the ESIP is provided at appropriate locations throughout the site e.g. within process control rooms or adjacent to locations where placards are required by the WHS Reg.

At sites where there may be security concerns regarding the provision of plans in a locked container on site (e.g. schools etc), application can be made for alternative locations or means to provide responding emergency services with copies.

If there are compelling reasons to consider storing the manifest in another location, please email samfsscientificofficer@sa.gov.au to discuss the best position for its location.

The MFS and/or CFS will process your draft Emergency Plan, and if you have not received a formal response from the MFS and/or CFS within 90 days from your acknowledgement of receipt date, your draft Emergency Plan is not intended to be reviewed by the MFS and/or CFS.

If you have not received recommendations in relation to your Emergency Plan from the MFS and/or CFS within 90 days from your "acknowledgement of receipt date" your Emergency Plans status can be automatically modified to a "Final Emergency Plan" and formally implemented.

While waiting for the MFS and/or CFS to process your draft Emergency Plan, we strongly recommend that the draft Emergency Plan is implemented as an interim measure.

Yes, your Emergency Plan can be reviewed at a later stage, this may occur following your familiarisation visit by local MFS or CFS crews or where concerns about the adequacy of your Emergency Plan have arisen following an incident or the conduction of a simulated emergency drill exercise.

Yes, it is very important that you include your Safework SA Dangerous Goods Notification Number with your submitted documentation.

This number will be recorded and collated by the MFS and CFS, an annual report of Emergency Plans received by the MFS and CFS will be forwarded to Safework SA.

Safework SA will match the MFS and CFS report against their records and notifiable sites may be subject to penalties from Safework SA if an Emergency Plan has not been submitted to the MFS and/or CFS in accordance with the relevant legislation.

Yes, Regulation 43 of the Work Health and Safety Regulation 2012 requires your Emergency Plan to be revised if there is a change in circumstances at your premises.

If your site has exceeded Manifest quantities of Dangerous Goods as detailed in Schedule 11 of the Work Health and Safety Regulations 2012 and therefore subject to the provisions of Regulation 43 of the Work Health and Safety Regulations 2012 you are required to revise your Emergency Plan.

As a new hazard which has the potential to impact your site has been identified it is good practice to revise your Emergency Plan to address the new risk.

The MFS and CFS however, recommend that if a new off-site hazard has been identified which has the potential to impact your site, your Emergency Plan should be appropriately revised to address the new off-site risk.

Yes, Regulation 43 of the Work Health and Safety Regulations 2012 requires Emergency Plans to be maintained so they remain effective.

The MFS and CFS recommends that this is a minimum of every 5 years and also recommend that your Emergency Plans' contact list is revised annually, this will ensure that organisational changes in personnel are captured and thereby assist in maintaining the currency of your Emergency Plan.

A flowchart has been produced in PDF format detailing the process followed by the MFS and CFS after you have submitted your Emergency Plan.

You can download the flowchart here.

Yes, both Regulation 347, Regulation 361 and Regulation 557 of the Work Health and Safety Regulations 2012 have specific requirements in relation to providing copies of Final Emergency Plans to MFS and/or CFS.

Even though you are required to forward copies of the Final Emergency Plan to the fire service, there is no guarantee that fire crews responding to an incident at your site will be in a position to access their copy of your Emergency Plan (e.g. they may be away from their station when they receive a request to respond to an incident or another station which does not hold a copy of your Emergency Plan may be requested to respond).

A copy of the emergency plan and ESIP is to be provided and kept easily accessible to the SA Fire Services at all times. The following are acceptable locations for the manifest:

  • At the hydrant booster assembly, if fitted
  • At the main site entrance adjacent to the outer warning placard
  • Inside the security gatehouse or similar if staffed 24 hours 7 days
  • At alternative vehicular entrances adjacent to the outer warning placard (where provided)

The plans should be provided within a prominently labelled weather proofed container (e.g. a lock box), secured with a 003 lock if unauthorised access needs to be prevented.

Please see "Storing the Manifest" for further information.

For further information in relation to other obligations and statutory requirements associated with dangerous goods sites please go to the Safework SA website

OR
call the Safework SA switchboard on 1300 365 255

Fire Alarm Systems - General

The National Construction Code (NCC) stipulates in which buildings smoke alarm and detection systems are to be provided.  The NCC is publicly available via the Australian Building Codes Board website.  There may, however, be a requirement for a smoke alarm and detection system in your building specific to your building’s particular approval requirements and Certificate of Occupancy.  Such systems should be listed on the schedule of Essential Safety Provisions (ESPs) for your building.

The owner of the premises is responsible for ensuring the ongoing maintenance of the installed Essential Safety Provisions, which include all the fire safety systems.

Under the Fire and Emergency Services Act 2005 Section 135 it is an offence to interfere with a fire alarm or signalling device and may incur a penalty of up to $5000.

The use of an approved, integrated “Performance Mode” function on a fire alarm system is not considered to be “interference” as described above.

Please contact the Manager, Built Environment Section on 08 8204 3611 to discuss possible mitigation measures or alternative arrangements if you are concerned about the potential to cause an unwanted false alarm.

Fire Alarm Systems - Monitoring

There are two (2) separate Telstra Application forms that are applicable; one for a new fire alarm connection and the other for an existing monitored fire alarm service (MFAS) when undergoing an alteration to the alarm signalling equipment (ASE) or relocating an existing fire panel.  These forms can be acquired by contacting the Telstra MFAS Operations team at mfasoperations@team.telstra.com.

For information regarding monitored fire alarm system disconnections, please refer to our Disconnection of a Monitored Fire Alarm System page.

You will need to arrange for the MFS monitored fire alarm system to be cancelled or disconnected.

Prior to the Telstra ASE being removed, you will need to arrange for your fire alarm maintenance contractor to have the alarm outputs from the fire indicator panel (FIP) or sprinkler system connected as separate ‘identifiable’ inputs to the site security monitoring system.  Instructions will need to be provided to the security monitoring company on what actions are to be taken upon receipt of an alarm signal from the fire system(s).

The Telstra ASE can then be removed.

For information regarding the disconnection of an MFS monitored fire alarm system, please refer to our Disconnection of a Monitored Fire Alarm System [link] page.

The “end-of-line” equipment (or Alarm Signalling Equipment (ASE)) installed at your premises is required to convert the alarm signals from your fire indicator panel or fire sprinkler system, into a form that can be recognised by the MFS’s alarm monitoring equipment.

The connection between your premises and the MFS monitoring equipment must meet the reliability standard listed in the National Construction Code (NCC), which is Australian Standard AS1670.3. The required reliability for the system is 99.95% across all ASE connections.

It has been accepted by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) that the reliability of the Telstra Dual-SIM mobile network, utilising separate data paths and redundant communication providers, meets the ‘public safety’ condition of providing a ‘dedicated’ service, together with the 99.95% reliability.

In accordance with the ACCC Determination, Telstra is the only appointed provider of fire alarm monitoring services between your premises and the MFS monitoring equipment, using the Telstra Managed Fire Alarm Service (MFAS).

Hydrant Systems

The building owner or manager is responsible for arranging and authorising maintenance and rectification work for all onsite fire safety systems.  The building owner/manager should contact the appointed fire services maintenance company to arrange the necessary rectification works.

The building owner or manager is responsible for arranging and authorising maintenance and rectification work for all onsite fire safety systems.  The building owner/manager should contact the appointed fire services maintenance company to arrange the necessary rectification works.

Street/Public Fire Hydrants

In accordance with the Australian Road Rules under the Road Traffic Act 1961, it is an offence to park a vehicle within 1m of a fire hydrant, fire hydrant indicator, or fire plug indicator (Rule 194).  Vehicles in breach of this road rule can be reported to the local council or SAPOL.

If a vehicle is parked such that it obstructs a fire hydrant or fire hydrant indicator, then the fire service may not be able to access water for firefighting in the event of an emergency and an alternate water source will need to be located.  This can delay effective firefighting response to a fire.

The location of fire hydrants within or adjacent to public roads is required to be indicated so that the fire service can locate it.  It also aids in ensuring vehicles are not parked over the top of or blocking access to these hydrants.  There are a number of identification measures which can be utilised however.  Please contact SA Water to discuss options for identification of public fire hydrants.

Fire Extinguishers and Fire Hose Reels

Fire Exits

Any obstruction to a fire exit should be removed.  The obstruction of a fire exit from a building can impact the ability of occupants to safely leave a building in the event of an emergency.  If the removal of any such obstruction cannot easily be resolved, it should be reported to the local council.  Councils have the authority to issue notices on a property directing rectification work occur.

Details regarding the requirements and locations for exit signs and directional exit signs are provided in the National Construction Code and Australian Standard AS/NZS 2293.1.

Fire Hazards and Complaints

If you are concerned that the situation presents an immediate danger or risk to safety, please call 000 immediately.

Otherwise, please contact your local council for information regarding burning in the open.

Please contact the local council and ask to speak with their Fire Prevention Officer.

Please contact the local council and ask to speak with their Fire Prevention Officer.

Please contact the local council and ask to speak with their Fire Prevention Officer.

Fire Safety and Evacuation Procedure Training

The MFS does not provide this service. Please contact a private fire and evacuation training service provider.

The MFS encourages regular evacuation training and practice exercises. The MFS does not need to be notified of such activities.